News

Executive Order Mandates Covid Testing for Non-Vaccinated City Employees

HOPE members have been on the frontlines serving our communities since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Your union has been calling for regular testing, outbreak notices, disinfection updates, and other pandemic concerns since March of 2020 to keep our members safe. While City Leadership has worked with HOPE in the recent past, we are alarmed at how this recent policy has come about without members being involved.

Regardless of any of our individual positions on vaccines or mandatory testing, what is clear is that your union does not support any mandate concerning working conditions, employee health, or terms of employment unless the Mayor negotiates with HOPE Local 123 Members to ensure that the public service heroes of this pandemic are treated fairly.

Follow the Link HERE to see the Official Correspondence sent to the Mayor and City Council.

Your HOPE President and Executive Director met with Human Resources on Thursday, September 9th, for answers to some of the many questions City Employees have asked us and to call for the City of Houston to begin negotiations on this policy immediately.

HOPE 2021 Meet & Confer Agreement

Attention City Employees, you now have a

Some of the nation’s largest cultural institutions accepted more than $1.6 billion in federal help to weather the coronavirus pandemic, but continued to let go of workers – even though the assistance was meant to shore up payrolls and keep workers on the job, according to a report released by AFSCME Cultural Workers United.

When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

“This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”

The pandemic has led many of us to take stock of our lives and our goals. For AFSCME New Jersey member LaTrenda Ross, the pandemic ignited a long-held dream—starting her own life coaching business.

“I was thinking about revamping my whole entire life,” recalls Ross, a member of Local 2306. “I was looking out for things I want to do, things I haven’t been going after.”

More Americans approve of labor unions today than at any time since 1965, according to annual Gallup poll results released around each Labor Day.

More than two-thirds of poll respondents – 68% – approved of labor unions. That means a clear majority of voters views labor unions favorably. Among adults 18-34 years of age, 77% approve of unions. Support is also high among those with annual household incomes under $40,000.

Workers Memorial Day 2021 arrives at a moment of the greatest urgency, when the front lines of the war against COVID-19 run through America’s workplaces.

Workers in health care and social service industries are a big step closer to having safer workplaces.

On Friday, the House of Representatives passed the Workplace Violence Prevention for Health Care and Social Service Workers Act (H.R.1195) by a bipartisan vote of 254 to 166. The bill requires the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to issue a standard to prevent workplace violence in health care and social service assistance settings.