News

Executive Order Mandates Covid Testing for Non-Vaccinated City Employees

HOPE members have been on the frontlines serving our communities since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Your union has been calling for regular testing, outbreak notices, disinfection updates, and other pandemic concerns since March of 2020 to keep our members safe. While City Leadership has worked with HOPE in the recent past, we are alarmed at how this recent policy has come about without members being involved.

Regardless of any of our individual positions on vaccines or mandatory testing, what is clear is that your union does not support any mandate concerning working conditions, employee health, or terms of employment unless the Mayor negotiates with HOPE Local 123 Members to ensure that the public service heroes of this pandemic are treated fairly.

Follow the Link HERE to see the Official Correspondence sent to the Mayor and City Council.

Your HOPE President and Executive Director met with Human Resources on Thursday, September 9th, for answers to some of the many questions City Employees have asked us and to call for the City of Houston to begin negotiations on this policy immediately.

HOPE 2021 Meet & Confer Agreement

Attention City Employees, you now have a

The COVID-19 pandemic arrived at a time when our nation’s health care workers were already experiencing burnout.

In the 1980s, I was living and going to school in Minnesota when women who worked for state government won a big victory. They got the state to increase the pay of women in “female dominated jobs” by passing a pay equity bill. In other words, they put a dent in the gender pay gap. As a student, I researched and wrote about the process of crafting, passing and implementing that legislation. And I learned something that I have never forgotten: the union made it happen. And not just any union. Our union: AFSCME. 

Our union gained more than 9,000 dues-paying members and nearly 19,000 dues-paying retirees in the last year, suggesting that billionaires and corporations are failing in their effort to “defund and defang” public service unions.

Workers in Missouri and New Mexico have chalked important victories against anti-worker laws that would have robbed them of their voices and the right to bargain collectively.

In Missouri, two separate anti-worker measures, HB 1413 and SB 1007, were halted by state courts last week.

LAS VEGAS — More than 160 AFSCME members gathered in Las Vegas last week to lift up the voice of public service workers and move our union forward.  

At the AFSCME Volunteer Member Organizer Rise Up conference, VMOs from around the country attended skill-building training sessions and visited Nevada state employees to share the vision of improving the quality of public services and the lives of those who provide those services. 

A federal court has ruled in favor of working families and against wealthy special interests in Danielson v. AFSCME Council 28, a case out of Washington state.  

LOS ANGELES — As fires burned in Northern and Southern California and the death toll continued to rise; as smoke engulfed nearby cities, prompting health warnings to stay indoors; and as survivors relocated to makeshift camps and hoped for the best, the best often

Pamela Knight, a child protective investigator with the Illinois Department of Children and Family Service (DCFS), was sent to check on the welfare of a child last fall. When she arrived at the child’s residence, the father viciously attacked her. She died months later as a result of the injuries she sustained during the attack.

This summer, I joined thousands of union members at a rally in Philadelphia to speak out against the Trump administration’s family separation policy. I was there to represent our union’s vision and values. We reject an immigration policy based on fear and cruelty. We embrace an immigration policy based on our common humanity, one that treats everyone with decency and dignity.