News

Executive Order Mandates Covid Testing for Non-Vaccinated City Employees

HOPE members have been on the frontlines serving our communities since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Your union has been calling for regular testing, outbreak notices, disinfection updates, and other pandemic concerns since March of 2020 to keep our members safe. While City Leadership has worked with HOPE in the recent past, we are alarmed at how this recent policy has come about without members being involved.

Regardless of any of our individual positions on vaccines or mandatory testing, what is clear is that your union does not support any mandate concerning working conditions, employee health, or terms of employment unless the Mayor negotiates with HOPE Local 123 Members to ensure that the public service heroes of this pandemic are treated fairly.

Follow the Link HERE to see the Official Correspondence sent to the Mayor and City Council.

Your HOPE President and Executive Director met with Human Resources on Thursday, September 9th, for answers to some of the many questions City Employees have asked us and to call for the City of Houston to begin negotiations on this policy immediately.

HOPE 2021 Meet & Confer Tentative Agreement Ratification

Attention City Employees, you now have a 2021 Meet and Confer Tentative Agre

When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

Editor’s note: The following is a story from the front lines of the fight against COVID-19, as told by a member in Washington state:

“My name is Kristina Johnson-Short and I am a social services specialist with the Division of Children, Youth and Families in Washington state. I’m a proud AFSCME member, a shop steward and president of AFSCME Local 1054 (WFSE). I am also a domestic violence survivor.

It’s become clear that relief bills Congress has approved thus far, including the record $2.2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, won’t be enough to quell the health and economic fallout caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

What other aid should Congress provide? AFSCME has recommendations.

AFSCME members working for the Louisiana Workforce Commission (LWC) are hopping busy these days fulfilling a critical mission. They are helping Louisianans survive as the Bayou State’s economy buckles under pressure from the coronavirus pandemic.

Updating wills before heading into work. Extending the lives of single-use masks. Self-isolating from their own families. These are just some of the shameful realities and conditions health care workers on the front lines of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic are facing each day.

Before the announcement early Wednesday of an unprecedented $2 trillion deal to combat the coronavirus pandemic, AFSCME President Lee Saunders and three front-line workers put pressure on federal lawmakers to come through with a robust aid package for state and local governments so they can rebuild decimated public services.

The coronavirus aid package that cleared Congress is just not good enough for public service workers. That’s the takeaway message from AFSCME President Lee Saunders.

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) emerges in the United States, many AFSCME members are and will continue to be on the front lines caring for and transporting those afflicted with the virus. Workers in emergency services, health care, child care, educational institutions and many others may come in contact with people who’ve contracted the coronavirus, putting themselves at risk.